Sarah Carter Studio » artist | photographer | writer | advocate

fast fashion

hello! its been a while. haha, okay its been a loooong while. its been a busy summer full of travel and hosting and friends and family visiting from all over. our hearts and home are full. and lately i’ve noticed, so is my closet. too full, i think. i’m still on the capsule plan, but perhaps not as strictly as i need to be. part of the challenge i’ve realized is that when you’re not adding much to your closet, it can be hard to remember what your personal style is. when you’re not being constantly influenced by ads shouting the latest trends you absolutely must have, everything gets quiet. which is lovely, but also kind of… bland. the capsule experiment has been a fantastic tool to get a real handle on my clothes. i know now what i have and what i don’t, what i like to wear and what gets pushed to the back of the closet. usually those are the things i bought on an impulse, which almost always turns out to be a mistake. i shop smarter now, considering more than just a sale tag. how does it fit? is this a color i will actually wear? what else in my closet will it go with? and lately, i’ve added one more question to the mix: is it made responsibly?

 

Screen Shot 2017-07-22 at 11.27.02 AMi don’t think i realized the true cost of my clothes. the majority of brands readily accessible to us are made by slaves. i know thats a strong statement, but its true. our demand for cheap, trendy clothing has created a global crisis called fast fashion. when we treat clothes as a throw-away commodity because they are so inexpensive, we’re not taking into account the person on the other side of the world. and that someone is paying a huge price so you can buy that polyester top from h&m for five dollars.

so i did some research into solutions to this problem. liking fashion isn’t the problem, and there are ways to express yourself through your closet while honoring the people who participated in its creation. one of the best tools i’ve found is a company called cladwell. they’ve developed an app you can download on your phone. this app lets you build your literal closet by choosing items you already own. then it puts together daily outfits (it even takes into account the weather for the day!) so that you can wake up and create more outfits with fewer items. i realized i haven’t lost my personal style – i’ve just gotten lazy about how i put my clothes together. this app had helped *ps – this totally isn’t an ad or paid endorsement – i am just excited to share because i really think it can help more of us move away from fast fashion into a capsule lifestyle.

cladwell1

Here are some simple steps anyone can take right now to help beat fast fashion:

+create a capsule wardrobe and address your shopping habits
+when you shop, shop thoughtfully by replacing fast fashion brands with those that are transparent about how their clothes are made
+document your journey, tell others, and encourage those around you to take reasonable steps toward simplicity and sustainability

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